Honolulu

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Honolulu’s resilience journey

Located on the most isolated archipelago in the world, Honolulu faces a host of environmental challenges related to weather change, including hurricanes and typhoons, tsunamis, rainfall flooding, and rising sea levels. Honolulu’s Located on the most isolated archipelago in the world, Honolulu faces a host of environmental challenges related to weather change, including hurricanes and typhoons, tsunamis, rainfall flooding, and rising sea levels.

Honolulu’s island location means that its critical urban infrastructure is completely independent, and it cannot rely on neighboring grids for support in times of need. A strong hurricane could damage sea and air ports, creating food crises in a city that imports almost all of its commodities, and could devastate the fragile local economy, which is heavily dependent on tourism.

A strong evacuation plan and public outreach programs have already helped to minimize the impacts of tsunamis, and the city is currently updating its disaster mitigation plans to account for rising sea levels and other shocks.

Honolulu is also looking to address increased homelessness, compounded by the location of informal settlements along the coast, where inhabitants are more vulnerable to extreme climate events.

Meet the Chief Resilience Officer

Josh Stanbro

Chief Resilience Officer and Executive Director

Josh Stanbro brings a wealth of sustainability experience and a track record of developing partnerships to his new role as CRO. He has served as Program Director for the Hawai’i Community Foundation since 2009, where he led the Hawai’i Fresh Water Initiative and the Community Restoration Partnership. Josh previously worked as Project Manager for the Trust for Public Land Hawai’i, where he completed the acquisition of over 25,000 acres of land for preservation in perpetuity. He has worked in various roles with Envision Hawai’i, the Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Planning Advisory Group, the South Kona-Ka’u Coastal Conservation Task Force, and the Hawai’i Forest Stewardship Committee.

Josh holds a BA from Claremont McKenna College, and a JD from Boalt Hall School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley. He spent a visiting semester at the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, where he earned a Cali Award in Native Hawai’ian Rights.

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Honolulu